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Interested in Taking a Trip With Me to Greece and Turkey?

I have just finalized the deal.  I will be giving lectures on an amazing trip to Greece and Turkey this coming June, 2019, with a company called Thalassa Journeys.  The theme is centered around the journeys of the apostle Paul, and is called “St. Paul in the World of Late Antiquity: Civilizations and Faiths in Transition.”

For the trip we go to some of the key places in Paul’s missionary work:  Thessaloniki, Philippi, Ephesus (staying on the Isle of Samos!), Patmos (connected of course with John the author of Revelation, rather than Paul: but it’s in the area and is an important site!), Athens, and Corinth.    On the trip I’ll be lecturing on various aspects of Paul’s travels and teachings, and will be hanging out, of course, with other travellers the whole time.   The itinerary and planning all look truly great.  You interested?

If so, CLICK HERE to download the brochure.  I think you’ll agree, it looks terrific.  Anyone connected with the blog (or anyone else who sees this who can claim to be a “friend or follower of Prof Ehrman” (!) can receive a discount of $300 per person for reservations made by January 15.

I hope some of you can come.  It looks like a first-rate trip, to important and interesting places in a great part of the world.


Gift Memberships 2018!
Blog Dinner! Denver, November 15

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Comments

  1. Diane  November 14, 2018

    Any plans to lead a tour to Israel again in the future? I’d jump on that one!

  2. TimKendrick  November 14, 2018

    Would love to go on another trip with you, but unfortunately we have a planned trip to Norway and Sweden in June. But to anyone reading this who is trying to decide whether to go or not – do it! We just did an Israel trip with Bart and it was absolutely fantastic!

  3. gwayersdds  November 14, 2018

    I Would love to go to Greece. The brochure says the cost of flights within Greece is not included. How much will those flights cost?

    • Bart
      Bart  November 16, 2018

      It depends on a large number of factors. Simply check online from your point of departure.

  4. JohnKesler  November 14, 2018

    This looks like a wonderful trip, and the brochure is fantastic. For those of us as poor as Corinthian church mice, who would like to enjoy the trip vicariously, will anyone video-record the lectures/sight-seeing?

  5. hankgillette  November 15, 2018

    I could see myself becoming really annoying on the same boat with you for 11 days. Just sayin’.

  6. DavidNeale  November 15, 2018

    Alas not – I have a policy of not flying because of its impact on climate change. Also it’s somewhat out of my price range!

  7. Judith  November 15, 2018

    Are you thinking it could be even close to how awesomely wonderful your October Israel trip was?

  8. spartymanjb  November 15, 2018

    That trip looks amazing. What a fantastic idea. If I wasn’t already going to Europe this year, I would so go. Please keep us posted on any future trips.

  9. meohanlon  November 15, 2018

    I wish I could join you Dr. Ehrman! That does look like an amazing trip.

    I did have a question, one that would’ve fit perfectly a few posts ago when you addressed Jesus’ identifying himself as God. Regarding something that has always intrigued me. In John 10:33-34 When the authorities want to stone Jesus for claiming to be God, he refers I think to psalm 82:6 in his defense. “Is it not written in your law that ‘ye are gods, ,and all of you are children of the most high” which apparently was convincing enough.

    What do you make of this? It seems like something a Gnostic would affirm; a divine nature in each individual.

    • Bart
      Bart  November 16, 2018

      Yes, it seems that Jesus is trying to trap them more than anything else. But his point is that all people are “children of God,” and so for him to declare himself divine isn’t any different (or much different). It’s always seemed like a clever and not altogether ingenuous line of arguing to me, since he is indeed claiming for himself something different than for all others.

  10. HenriettePeterson  November 15, 2018

    Bart, in your book you say the common assumption that first Christians were hiding in the catacombs and were persecuted and thrown to lions all the time is false. But there obviously were even official persecutions. Could you perhaps write a blog to put this in context (give a bigger more objective and accurate picture)?

  11. Hormiga  November 15, 2018

    Any suggestions for how to get from the US to Thessaloniki? I checked for Texas, and the options seem to be dauntingly expensive or agonizingly long.

    • Bart
      Bart  November 16, 2018

      Yes, it’s probably expensive. The only way to know is to check out options online.

  12. Iskander Robertson  November 15, 2018

    if the name “jesus” was a name jewish mothers gave their infant children, then these woman would be careful not to identify “jesus” as “yhwh” right ?

    Isaiah is also a name which has yhwh doing something, but there is no evidence that isaiah was identified as yhwh, right ?

    The names “jesus” and “isaiah” were not names jews used to identify their invisible GOd.

    i dont think even author of acts identify “jesus” as yhwh.

    It seems it is the gentile christians who start identifying jesus with invisivle yhwh.

    Can you imagine jewish mums in first century saying “in the name of jesus….”

    todays gentile christians have no issue with this, but surely jewish people in first century would have said,

    “What the hell are you saying” ?

    • Bart
      Bart  November 16, 2018

      I’m not sure what you mean. Jesus and YHWH were different names. So is Isaiah.

      • Iskander Robertson  November 17, 2018

        i am asking , does it make sense that mary would name her son “jesus” and then identify “jesus” as yhwh?

        On the other hand, christians identify “jesus” as yhwh.

        • Bart
          Bart  November 18, 2018

          Jesus and YHWH are normally understood as distince (son and father)

    • JulieGraff  November 17, 2018

      Your question is bringing up something interesting…

      I never liked the mentioning of the ‘in the name of Jesus’ as the way to save in the gospels as Jesus himself did not point to himself but to ‘the father’ *why do you say I’m good, there is only one that is good’…

      but your question pointed me to “in the name” .. not “in the person”… and the name Jesus is a greek adaptation of the name Yehoshua wish means: God Saves!

      and that is important as it points to the first ‘Commandement’… “I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.”

      and that is very important because there is so much to say about the fact that the first ‘Commandement’ is not about the fact that G.od is the Creator (He could have boasted about that right from the start of the Big Speach) but that He is the one that saves!

      In the Name of …(the name explains alot about someone or something) … God Saves

  13. chrispope  November 16, 2018

    Bart:
    I would have loved to have joined you (not least to have spent some time in your company) but unfortunately the cost of the trip is way beyond my means. I wish you, and those able to join you, a superb experience.
    I lived in Paphos, Cyprus, for five years and walked every day along the coast to the ‘agora’ ruins and mosaics which were around in Paul’s times and feature in the stories/legends/myths of Paul’s visit to Cyprus. Fascinating, but not half as fascinating as it would have been with a historian such as yourself to put things in context – and to help one half-close your eyes and squint a bit to try to ignore the modern developments which threaten to destroy antiquarian evidence.
    Best wishes and good luck with your trip.

  14. RAhmed  November 16, 2018

    Oh man that sounds incredible! I took a two week tour of Turkey 4 years ago and have been itching to go back. As it happens though, I am expecting a kid at the end of June so I won’t be able to join you.

  15. richard  November 17, 2018

    Bart, it sounds like a great trip with a great historian. Having said that, I was wondering for the sake of those people who find themselves “financially challenged”, have you ever thought of conducting similar but really low budget trips? I am sure many will jump on it. What do you think?

    • Bart
      Bart  November 18, 2018

      I simply do the trips I”m asked to do; unfortunately I have no say over the budgets!

      • Pattycake1974
        Pattycake1974  November 19, 2018

        You could always organize a trip yourself and invite blog members. Maybe a blog member would volunteer to organize it for you. I’ve been looking at other tours, and they’re half the cost of this one. I really feel like this company is price gouging. It’s geared toward wealthy people—and only wealthy people. So was the last trip. The average person will *never* get to go on one of these trips.

        • Bart
          Bart  November 21, 2018

          I’m not really looking for work! But I do make time to attend tours (sometimes) that others have organized.

  16. Bamayorgo  November 19, 2018

    Looks like a great trip Dr. Ehrman. My father is a Greek immigrant, came here in 1969 at age 17! Needless to say, we’ve been back many many times.
    Be sure to visit the souvlaki shop right next to the Corinth Canal it looks like you’re going to, we stop by every time on our way from Athens to his “part of Greece” where we usually stay.

  17. Charlesintexas  December 2, 2018

    Darn the luck. We just did this trip with Collette in October. The experience would have been 10 times better with your commentary.

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